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 Analyses & Metas sur la série

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MessageSujet: Analyses & Metas sur la série   Mar 25 Juil - 22:14

Je vous propose de venir partager les analyses et metas sur la série qui vous paraissent intéressants ou pertinents de partager.
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MessageSujet: Re: Analyses & Metas sur la série   Mar 25 Juil - 22:14

Un excellent meta sur Dean et son développement en saison 12 et à venir en saison 13 :


Citation :
Dean’s climax and denouement in season 13. Expositions through season 1 mirrors.

So, I’ve talked loads about how I feel that season 13 is subverting the pilot plot wise:

- Mary is the parent who is lost to be found, John is the parent who is dead.
- The Sam/ Jess v Dean/Cas parallels of 12x23.
- The Sam/Dean role reversal (also the precise words Jared used *yay!*). Sam is the one set on hunting, finding a way to fix things, trying to keep things together, Dean is the one mourning the loss of the person he loves, out for revenge and angry.

Basically for Dean’s own personal story:

- Pilot: Dean is first set up as uber-straight, butch and over compensating, faithless, feeling like he can’t have and doesn’t really deserve love, a hunter of the supernatural and living in the black and white, stab first - ask questions later, where supernatural beings are all evil and to be killed, he is Sam’s parent and guardian and Dean is less worthy of love and care than he is, whose mother up on her pedestal said that Angels were watching over him, but he’s not accepting of himself, expecting to die young, giving up his life for others and with a total lack of self worth.



Source :  http://weeklyspn.tumblr.com/post/158855969634

- Endgame: self worth, accepting himself for who he is as a whole, accepting that he likes things he has always repressed, that he is no longer Sam’s parent, that he needs to let Sam go, that he deserves good things for himself, that his mother and father are not perfect. That he is in love with a supernatural being, a guy, who represents faith, an Angel who watches over him (and who he can watch over when he falls), having said Angel give up something big for him as a mirror for everything he has given up for others, learning that the world is not black and white, where he finally accepts himself and thinks he doesn’t deserve to die young, finally feeling self worth…



Source : http://hunenka.tumblr.com/post/162327958524/spn-12x22-who-we-are-this-sounds-like-the

Regarding how I think this will play out in season 13:

We know now that 13x03 features Missouri Moseley. Who was a massive John mirror and was an exposition to why Dean is the way he is, repressed, self loathing and feeling worthless while Sam is to be protected and cared for. She and her granddaughter Patience are also psychics, a real coincidence given the point we will be at in 13x03 with Dean’s grief and emotions, hmmmmm.

We also know that we have the Scooby Doo episode where Dean potentially might flirt with or will at least come face to face with Daphne, the epitome of Dean’s old fantasies, the sweet, non threatening, childhood reminiscent kind of maternal reminding cartoon character, the best metaphor I can think of for Dean’s old facade and old way of dealing with things.

Basically everything we know so far, which is very little, about spoilers for season 13 point to the fact that they are absolutely using season 1 mirrors to show how much Dean has changed and grown, I mean throw in a couple of wendigos and ghosts, maybe, Chuck I hope for an episode where we see 2 brothers again like 1x18 but Dean doesn’t blame himself and tells the older brother to look out for himself and not always just his brother. I mean I don’t know how it will play out of course I just feel this as happening as a theme and hey if we do see Dean acting at times like a dude bro douche reminiscent of season 1 it’s probably exactly for this - to expose it and then smack it down because this ISN’T who he is and he knows that now, it’s just to show US.
off the top of my head (maybe I’ll meta properly about it at some point but right now I’m just flailing) but the themes in season 1 for Dean focus on:

- repression of emotions
- lack of self worth and self acceptance
- being Sam’s parent
- toxic masculinity
- bisexuality
- not feeling he deserves love

And these should now be addressed in order to expose that he is moving past them and has come out the other side of his long path to self acceptance and they already seem to be using the pilot/season 1 both plot-wise but also thematically to expose these to then subvert them.
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MessageSujet: Re: Analyses & Metas sur la série   Lun 16 Oct - 23:59

Je sais qu'on en avait parlé à un certain stade, je ne sais plus exactement où, mais concernant la bisexualité de Dean, voilà le commentaire de Ben Edlund et Phil Sgriccia (scénariste et directeur exécutif) pour l'épisode “Everybody hates Hitler” (8x13), avec la scène awkward où il se fait draguer par un gars :



"Potential for love in all places" ^^
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MessageSujet: Re: Analyses & Metas sur la série   Mar 17 Oct - 17:32

Une réponse intéressante à un post tumblr, concernant John Winchester et le fait qu'il ait maltraité ses enfants :

Citation :

Child neglect is child abuse.

Child neglect is defined as a type of maltreatment related to the failure to provide needed, age-appropriate care. Unlike physical and sexual abuse, neglect is usually typified by an ongoing pattern of inadequate care and is readily observed by individuals in close contact with the child. Once children are in school, personnel often notice indicators of child neglect such as poor hygiene, poor weight gain, inadequate medical care, or frequent absences from school. Professionals have defined four types of neglect: physical, emotional, educational, and medical.”

Supernatural is set in the USA.

In the USA. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) defines child abuse as “child maltreatment as any act or series of acts of commission or omission by a parent or other caregiver that results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child”. - SOURCE

But what about other countries? (from the same source)

A UK guidance

Working Together to Safeguard Children 2010 (1.33-1.36)

says that there are four types of child abuse:

-Emotional abuse
-Sexual abuse
-Physical abuse
-Neglect


Let’s go back to those things I highlighted shall we:

- “results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child .” John Winchester leaves his children as bait for the shtriga and gets pissed at 9 year old Dean when Dean leaves and it attacks Sam. Huh maybe he didn’t know they would be in danger? Nope “they feed on the spiritus vitae, or life essence, of others - mainly from children.” Even if Dean hadn’t left Sam he left his children around a place that he knows a monster was out hunting children. That is the textbook definition of potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child -  Season 1 Episode 18 - Something Wicked

Dean implies he was physically abused when John found out Sam ran away. That memory is one of same happiest and one of Dean’s worst. Even if you say the physical abuse is implied not explicit that look on Deans face is not something that comes from a good outcome of “when Dad got back” - Season 5 Episode 16 - Dark Side of the Moon results in harm

- “ failure to provide needed, age-appropriate care”  John Winchester left a 9 year Sam alone in motel room and then had him take a bus by himself to meet up with them across state lines - Season 11 Episode 8 - Just my imagination.

John leaves them with less food than they both need causing Dean to sacrifice his share - Season 1 Episode 18 - Something Wicked

Dean Winchester knew his father was possessed by demon when he praised him

Just Dean is a testament to John’s mental abuse. John did not raise his sons. He left that job to Dean. Dean’s compulsive need to keep Sam around stems from from a lifetime of being assigned that very task: He wasn’t merely told to keep Sam safe, he was practically programmed to always, always, always put Sam first. Dean’s self-worth is so tied up in whether or not Sam has a pulse that over and over and over again he’s made terrible decisions with that singular goal in mind—and he’ll continue to make terrible decisions because he can’t help it.

Like please, John is an interesting character, I am sure he loved his sons and his final act was to sacrifice himself of them, but yes he was abusive. By YOUR own admission he was neglectful and neglect is child abuse.


Source : https://chattyanon.tumblr.com/post/140641782590/supernatural-cheerleader-bibrosbelike
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MessageSujet: Re: Analyses & Metas sur la série   Ven 8 Déc - 0:34

Un excellent, excellent article de Hypable au sujet de la saison 13 et la manière dont sont traités les deuils de Dean et Sam :



Les passages qui m'ont le plus marquée (mais honnêtement, tout l'article est awesome, vraiment à lire !) :

Citation :
What is Supernatural trying to prove?

The short answer? Their endgame. Losing Cas was never actually going to be about losing Cas. Losing Mary was never actually going to be about losing Mary. This was always going to be about the effect this would have on the Winchesters. The extended exploration of the brothers’ grief in the wake of these losses was never about the raising the stakes for those “dead” characters, or to hype the shock surprise of their return.

It was to force the audience to recognize who Sam and Dean are now, where they’re at on their journey, what they want from their future, and, quite simply, what they can’t live without. It was to force the audience to recognize exactly how much the priorities of the Winchesters – and therefore the priorities of Supernatural itself – have changed.


Citation :
“Grief, I’ve learned, is really love,” wrote Jamie Anderson in a rather famous and oft-quoted blog. “It’s all the love you want to give but cannot give. The more you loved someone, the more you grieve. All of that unspent love gathers up in the corners of your eyes and in that part of your chest that gets empty and hollow feeling. The happiness of love turns to sadness when unspent. Grief is just love with no place to go.”

Over the course of those first five episodes, as Dean allows this grief to take hold of him more fully than ever before, he’s swept into a downward spiral which culminates in his own death.

At no point does he adjust, cope, “get over” or come to terms with what he has experienced – rather, he’s rescued from it, wrenched out of it when Castiel returns. He’s doused in elation, a living embodiment of Hyperbole and a Half’s “maybe everything isn’t hopeless bullshit” comic. Before that? He has checked out, he has left the building.

What we witness here is Dean’s absolute rock bottom. The thing is, it’s not Sam’s. And that’s the one of the crucial conclusions that Supernatural is guiding their audience to draw.

Firstly, the time that season 13 dedicates to exploring the differences in how Sam and Dean are handling this turn of events implies a lot about their individual self-worth or lack thereof. It’s a fascinating dichotomy, mostly because the world of the Winchesters is a world where anything can – and has – happened.

Citation :
Unlike Dean and his pleading prayers, Sam is not acting as if this is the end of the road. He’s not dismissive, and he’s not unaffected, but he’s proactive, because Sam believes in miracles. More than that: he believes he deserves miracles.

Sam is our big picture solution guy, on Supernatural. Unlike Dean, Sam is very rarely portrayed as truly happy at any given moment, and to me that’s always been symbolic of his lack of contentment with the way things are in general.

I feel pretty confident in saying that Sam didn’t believe they “had it made,” back when Dean did. His bar for an ideal future is set much, much higher than Dean’s, because he truly believes that they can have, and that they deserve, more.

Dean’s nihilism and uncontrollable despair hits him (and us) so hard because he believes that he’s lost the best chance at happiness that he’ll ever have, but for Sam, it’s more a case of same shit, different day, we’ll get through it, we’ll find a way. His needs weren’t being met yet anyway – he simply did not have the “everything” that Dean feels they had lost in the first place.

It doesn’t mean he loves the other individuals less – though he certainly has different relationships to Dean with each, representing different things, another factor that this season highlights in multiple ways. Sam loves differently, wants differently, and is affected differently, sometimes, in the past, to the point of his needs being in direct opposition to Dean’s.

Our boys have done some growing, though, so rather than this emotional discrepancy being a source of conflict in season 13, it’s more just an open discussion about how, while they’re very much still on the same side, right now they’re not on the same page.

Citation :
In the best possible way, this plot is making it crystal clear that Sam and Dean against the world is not enough for Dean any more, in the same way that it has NEVER been enough for Sam. The one-and-only codependency dynamic between Sam and Dean has always been unusual and unbalanced, a product of circumstance rather than an active choice – it’s always been shown that Dean is needier than Sam, that Sam copes by detaching while Dean copes by clinging.

They certainly both love each other more than they each love anything else, but the way they express that love, and what they can live through because of it, is not a mirror image. Their ideal relationship with one another looks very different from either side. But what we’ve watched unfold during season 13 is a huge confirmation that Sam is no longer the only person capable of breaking Dean’s heart, that having Sam by his side is not enough to keep him going.

It’s hard to say which loss is the more tragic and the more unbearable for Dean – his unexpected second chance with Mary, or Castiel, who, over the past ten years, has earned his unconditional and unshakable place in Dean’s heart, right next to Sam.

It’s also hard for the viewer to weigh those losses as equal, because we know that Mary is alive, and – even though his return was promised – we also had to mourn Castiel. We knew he’d be back, but we didn’t know how – or even who, if the Cas we got back would be the same Cas with the same well-earned development.

For the viewer, and for the Winchesters, the loss of Mary is conceptual, and the way each brother feels about that is a major window into their individual psyches – like we covered above, Sam, the miracle worker, automatically assumes a hopeful outcome, and not only that, he assumes that Dean will also assume it, whereas Dean immediately begins punishing himself for ever believing in something too good to be true.

But the loss of Castiel is tangible, and is treated as such. The air is thick with it, it is on the tip of every tongue. His very absence is a presence, and that is a stark, stark contrast to the farewells and funerals of the friends they’ve lost before.

Charlie, Kevin, Ellen, Jo, Lisa and Ben, even Bobby and their father – once they’ve lost someone, Dean tends to tamp it down, refuse to even remember them. He, to paraphrase his own quotes about pain and loss this season, mans up and moves on – not in a healthy, coming to terms with it way, by golly gosh no, but in a “let’s never mention that again so I don’t have to remember that that situation ever existed” way.

This was different. Every crucial conversation, every climax, every screaming match or every pause where more is left unsaid that said – it’s all Castiel. Even in “The Big Empty,” where Sam’s grief about Mary takes center stage, Cas is in the empty spaces in between – his own battle with The Empty is also a central part of that episode, and the amount a time a sentence about the boys’ grief is left hanging and then cuts to him, the narrative conclusion to the statement, is staggering.

While the cast and creators have been careful to describe the losses of Mary and Castiel as both very important, and the combination of them being more important still, we still see a… leaning, shall we call it, one way or the other, from each brother. Whenever the boys remember what they’ve lost, particularly when it gets heated, it’s always cries of “Mom” first, ripped from Sam’s mouth, and “Cas” from Dean’s.

There’s even the parallel of Dean taking three episodes and an screaming match to even manage to say the words “Cas” and “dead” in the same sentence, only for him to then turn around and accuse Sam of the same kind of behaviour about their mother the following week.

These two fights – at the end of episode three, “Patience,” and in Mia’s office in “The Big Empty,” cover a lot of ground emotionally, and reveal a lot about what’s most prominently on their minds. Seeing Dean bellow at Sam about Jack’s part in Castiel’s death (“You might be able to forget about that, but I can’t!”) shows his hand in a way that is truly shocking, and Sam’s explosion about Mary does the same.

Citation :
Sam accepts Castiel’s death. He doesn’t like it, but he accepts it and seems to view it as a sad loss that he can move on from. He cannot accept the great unknown of Mary, because there’s a chance that she could be saved and because he feels personally wronged.

Dean accepts Mary’s loss, because he’s already grieved her, and come to terms with losing her long ago. He cannot accept the finality of Castiel’s death, because he’d gotten to the point where the idea of living without Cas is as impossible as the idea of living without Sam.

The grief for Castiel is also exacerbated, of course, by Jack, also mourning his chosen father, a wildcard that I, for one, really did not see coming, just as I did not see coming the moments where Dean, alone, ritualistically prepares Castiel’s body and is visibly overcome, in a scene so bleak and so private that it sucks all the air out of the room.

Citation :
LESSON THE SECOND: SAM AND DEAN AGAINST THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH FOR DEAN ANYMORE.

This shift has been subtextual for some years – it’s something that I don’t think Dean’s thought about head-on very much. Mary’s return was the clincher, but it’s just straight up text now: Sam is no longer the only thing that Dean needs to maintain his heart, life and purpose, his sole reason for being, and yes, this is a good thing.

Some fans may see this as negative, but to me it’s actually amazing – because it shows that their relationship is finally balanced. Sam is not Dean’s job any more. They are equal partners. The fact that there are other people that have the capacity to break Dean’s heart is a GOOD thing, a healthy thing – inasmuch as this level of grief can be healthy – because this love from him shows a trust and a widening of his safety net.

While Dean still has plenty of issues with responsibility and failure, the development of his and Sam’s relationship has reached a point where Dean no longer feels like his only purpose on this planet is to look after Sammy. It is, no longer, his identity.

Citation :
It becomes clear in this moment, to Sam, and to us, that Dean is not just mourning Mary and Cas. Losing them was the last straw, but their losses represented something even greater. He has been mourning everyone he’s ever loved and lost, reliving every trauma he’s ever experienced, because if there really is no big picture to make those past losses in any way worth it, then he can’t repress them any more. He has to feel every single one of them, and know it was all for nothing.

And he needs a win, he tells us. He needs something to help him believe in the value of their past sacrifices. Well, as a friend of ours so recently said, this universe can be so many things, and sometimes, it is poetic.

Dean’s win, of course, the cosmic reward that the narrative grants him for his personal growth, is Cas. There’s a whole other story to be told here, about Castiel’s own representative battle with depression, his own sense of purpose and duty, but the the fact that Cas’s return IS the win that Dean needed to believe in his own worth again, is a huge statement for both of them.

It’s particularly poignant as a mirror to the moment last season where Cas used the same term, about needing a win, in order feel worthy of the boys’ unconditional love. There’s always been a huge discrepancy between himself and by Dean about the value of Cas’s mere presence, and what it means when Dean Winchester says he needs someone.
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