World is a Fiction

Vous aimez lire ou écrire des fanfictions sur des séries, des films ou autres? Ce forum est pour vous ^^
 
AccueilAccueil  CalendrierCalendrier  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Angel: le concept

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Miss Kitty
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
avatar

Messages : 9367
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : Out of this World

MessageSujet: Angel: le concept   Mer 1 Juil - 23:23



Après avoir quitté Sunnydale pour s'éloigner de son amour impossible: Buffy, Angel s'installe à Los Angeles, la ville des anges, celle qui regorge de créatures et démons en tout genre ...

Angel a un but bien précis en venant à L.A: obtenir sa rédemption!!
En effet, le vampire a décimé et tué pendant près de cent cinquante ans, des milliers de personnes à cause de son moi vampirique.
Aussi, pour apaiser sa conscience et se faire pardonner de tous les crimes odieux qu'il a commis, il décide de consacrer son temps et sa vie à aider les autres, les malheureux ... autrement dit à sauver l'humanité. Seul problème: il est seul!

C'est alors qu'il rencontre Doyle, un demi-démon qui lui servira de lien avec "les puissances supérieures". Les visions de Doyle vont guider le vampire dans toutes ses missions, dont une qui va d'ailleurs le conduire tout droit vers une vieille connaissance: Cordelia Chase, une "rescapée" de Sunnydale et celle-ci va très vite rejoindre le duo et alors "Angel Investigation" est née.

Malheureusement, quelques temps plus tard, Doyle se sacrifie pour sauver un groupe de demi-démons menacé de génocide. Mais avant, il transmet ses visions à celle qu'il estime être l'élue: Cordelia, qui en devient ainsi l'unique bénéficiaire.

La tristesse s'empare alors de nos deux compagnons mais un personnage de taille va faire son apparition et bouleverser le quotidien de nos deux héros. Il s'agit bien évidemment de Wesley Wyndham-Price alias l'ex-observateur de Buffy et Faith dans la troisième saison de la série 'Buffy contre les vampires'.

Rapidement, il va intégrer l'équipe et sera suivi à la fin de la première saison par Charles Gunn, un jeune noir du ghetto, chef d'un gang tueur de vampires.

L'équipe va aussi s'agrandir à la fin de la seconde saison avec la présence d'une jeune étudiante ramenée d'une dimension infernale où elle avait été enfermée pendant cinq longues années: Winifred "Fred" Burkle.

Mais ça n'est pas tout puisqu'un autre membre va venir grossir les rangs de l'équipe, il s'agit de Lorne, un démon chanteur voyant dans l'avenir des gens lorsque ceux-ci chantent ...

Angel se découvrira donc un terrible ennemi: le cabinet d'avocats Wolfram & Hart. Après avoir ramené Darla à la vie et avoir tenté de lui voler leur fils Connor, Wolfram & Hart finissent par proposer la direction de leur bureau de Los Angeles à Angel et ses partenaires. En somme, un pacte conclu avec la diable pour offrir à Connor une nouvelle vie. Quand à Cordélia, elle tombera dans le comas à la fin de la saison 4, ainsi deux autres survivants de Sunnydale viendront grossir les rangs: Spike et Harmony.

Mais deux vampires dotés d'une âme dans une même ville, cela ne risque t'il pas de faire des dégâts ???? La réponse restera vaine puisque la série s'achève sur une bataille dont on ne connaît les vainqueurs ... Le mystère planera toujours sur l'identité de l'héritier de la prophétie de Shanshu!

Source: Angel Hypnoweb
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://spuffy-and-cangel.forumactif.com/forum
Miss Kitty
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
avatar

Messages : 9367
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : Out of this World

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Lun 27 Juil - 15:05

Un article qui s'épanche sur le fait que jamais personne ne parle d'ATS quand ils évoquent le travail de Joss Whedon :



Citation :
The Series 'Angel' Was Joss Whedon's Best Work

And yet it remains underrated to this day.

As a writer and director, Joss Whedon is known for many things: his snarky one liners, his deft hand with group dynamics, his inability to let a couple be happy for longer than five minutes. His penchant for crushing your dreams with shocking character deaths long before Game of Thrones was even a sparkle in D.B. Weiss’ and David Benioff’s eyes. And of course, his most famous works.



Buffy changed the entire medium. Aside from being a damn good show with unforgettable characters, it showcased one of the first ass-kicking heroines who was still allowed to be feminine, one of the first gay kisses on TV, and it upped the ante for the supernatural genre (and TV in general) with such writing acrobatics as a silent episode or the episode that follows a side character on a doughnut run while the action happens offscreen. The Avengers then turned Whedon into a household name, and, for better or worse, paved the way for the era of superhero ensemble movies.

This wouldn’t exist if Whedon hadn’t shown Hollywood and the rest of the world that it could work:



But whether you’re an old-school Buffy fan, a Firefly loyalist, or new to the Whedon train thanks to The Avengers or Cabin In The Woods, when you hear someone talk about Joss Whedon, nobody ever says, “Oh yeah, the guy who did Angel!”

Well, they should. The entire series is on Netflix, and summer TV is pretty lame anyway, so you should dive in. While it may not be game-changing for the medium in the way that Buffy was — and with its early 2000s effects, it can’t be as splashy as The Avengers — Angel is Whedon’s best besides Buffy.

It’s got a lot going against it right out of the gate. As a spinoff, it’s guaranteed to be overshadowed by its predecessor, and as a spinoff about a guy who admittedly wasn’t the most interesting character on the original show — not to mention our current fatigue with brooding vampires — its easy to see why you’d say, “Why would I want to watch a show about Angel?” I’m glad you asked.

You want to watch it because Angel makes a surprisingly good protagonist.

In a Reddit AMA, Joss Whedon said Angel was his hardest character to write, because “how to make a decent, handsome, stalwart hero interesting — tough.”



That’s how you make him interesting: You get him to interact with people who give him shit. When he’s with Buffy, Angel doesn’t get a whole lot to do. He’s far more compelling as a protagonist than as the romantic lead. Dare I say, he’s more sympathetic than Buffy, who could be grating. His struggle for redemption after a lifetime of seriously fucked-up misdeeds makes Angel a darker, more mature show. For non-Buffy fans, Angel is pretty much Batman in L.A., only without the stupid Bat-voice. Whedon gets away with having a potentially too-perfect hero because any time Angel tries to be a stereotypical brooding vampire, the show doesn’t let him. He’s no chatterbox, but he’s surrounded by enough big personalities that the interplay works well. As a whole, Angel does for early adulthood what Buffy did for your teens: It tackles the struggles in an engaging way, often with a clever supernatural spin.

You want to watch it for Joss Whedon’s cameo. It’s the best anyone has ever done.

Joss Whedon is no Stan Lee or Hitchcock; he has only indulged in three cameos. His cameo in Angel is the greatest of all time. Angel is not afraid to get dark, but it’s also not afraid to be light and wacky. In a particularly memorable arc, Angel and his gang fall through a portal into a world called Pylea, where Angel’s green- skinned buddy Lorne is originally from. Below, Whedon is the dancing man, and if you click on no other clip here, you need to at least click on this one. It’s absolutely vital to your well-being.



You want to watch it for Wesley. Wesley Wyndham-Pryce.

Wesley has one of the most intriguing and dramatic character arcs of anybody on any TV show — not just Whedon’s. If you’re already familiar with Buffy, you know Wesley as the nebbish nerd who joins the gang in Season 3. Angel plays the long game, though, giving him time to develop. At first he continues as prudish comic relief. Just look at him dancing and trying to talk to a lady:



It’s really, really hard to believe that this guy evolves into a stone-cold badass. And yet, he does, and it’s utterly convincing. Over the course of five seasons, he morphs from goofy nerd to gritty tough-guy. Other shows have undertaken dramatic character transformations, but they often feel rushed or forced. Wesley earns every inch of his journey, and it’s a riveting, gut-punching ride.

You want to watch it for its stellar character development and engaging dynamics across the board.

Whedon can balance pulse-pounding action with quiet character beats like no other. And if you’ve seen Buffy, you know Cordelia isn’t exactly a sympathetic character. A spoiled narcissistic princess, she begins the series as a bully and ends it as an ally who still looks out for herself above all else. But on Angel, she undergoes a transformation almost as dramatically satisfying as Wesley’s. This might be heresy among some Buffy fans and Sarah Michelle Gellar herself, but Cordelia becomes a character who is a better, more mature match. Every relationship on Angel involves grey area. There are no easy outs, but there are also no arbitrary dramatics.



You should watch it because it stays consistent. It also makes a comeback.

Angel isn’t perfect. It veers off track for a handful of episodes in the fourth season. But unlike other shows that derail, Angel is able to veer back on (if you see Vincent Kartheiser on the screen, just hit fast forward and everything will be OK). This owes largely to consistency. Wolfram and Hart, the law firm that is literally connected to hell, has been a presence since the first episode. By making it the home base the final season, Angel achieves a full circle that many shows can’t manage for their final acts. It also brings back a seemingly forgotten character (Lindsay) that lesser shows would have kept discarded (ahem, GoT and Gendry in his boat). As a result, the fifth season contains some of the funniest (Smile Time), most devastating (A Hole In The World), and most moving (You’re Welcome) episodes representing Whedon at his Whedonest.



Speaking of the final act, you should watch Angel because of the finale.

Endings are important — just look to the subpar finales of Lost or The Sopranos. Even Buffy’s finale, while perfectly adequate, isn’t great (killing Anya as a ‘by-the-way’ afterthought? Giving the potentials screen time? Trying to awkwardly shoehorn Angel in and pretend Spike and Buffy isn’t a thing?). When you dive into a show, it’s nice to know ahead of time that it won’t let you down or fall apart. Angel culminates in one of the most satisfying finales in existence, with the exception of Six Feet Under.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://spuffy-and-cangel.forumactif.com/forum
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Lun 27 Juil - 18:58

Bon, plus le temps passe plus je vois Ats comme le bébé de Greenie et non pas Joss. Mais pour une fois que la série est vantée comme il se doit, je ne vais pas trop me plaindre ^^

En tout cas, merci pour l'info, c'est toujours agréable à lire

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
Miss Kitty
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
avatar

Messages : 9367
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : Out of this World

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Mar 28 Juil - 19:00

Héhé, je me doutais que ça te plairait :-)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://spuffy-and-cangel.forumactif.com/forum
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Lun 7 Mar - 21:55

Awwww this made my day Je ne pourrais jamais assez dire à quel point j'adore que CC soit la première fan de Cangel



Why You Should Watch Angel

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Sam 30 Juil - 18:47

Citation :
En saison 1, Angel prend ses quartiers à Los Angeles


Lorsqu’elle a été lancée le 5 octobre 1999, Angel commençait avec un certain handicap malgré son attractivité. Elle devait jouer avec le fait que son aînée, Buffy The Vampire Slayer, était devenue en l’espace de trois saisons une série culte à la portée internationale. Difficile de rivaliser et, si elle ne le fera jamais vraiment, étant constamment éclipsée dans l’ombre quand on regarde en arrière le Whedonverse, elle a eu son succès et mérite toute l’attention qu’on va lui porter ici.

La série débute après une dernière bataille à Sunnydale. Angel (David Boreanaz) décide de quitter la petite ville pour Los Angeles et d’ouvrir une agence de détective privé afin de combattre les démons qui peuplent la mégalopole américaine. Depuis que des bohémiens ont maudit le vampire en lui rendant son âme, il cherche à expier ses fautes en portant secours aux innocents. C’est cette mission personnelle qui constitue dès lors les fondations de la série.

En montant Angel Investigations avec comme slogan éloquent « Help the helpless« , le vampire s’impose une tâche à la finalité difficile à entrevoir tant elle est grande. Bien sûr, il recevra de l’aide. Son équipe se compose d’Allen Francis Doyle (Glenn Quinn), un demi-démon doté de visions envoyées par « The Powers That Be » – des puissances supérieures –, et de Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter). L’ancienne membre du Scooby Gang dont la carrière d’actrice peine à décoller rejoindra ainsi son vieil acolyte avec son légendaire caractère et un besoin certain d’argent (qui ne viendra jamais).

Les scénaristes installent avec cette équipe une formule à la semaine relativement simple : chaque vision de Doyle les mène sur une affaire surnaturelle et criminelle qui sera résolue à la fin de l’épisode – parfois avec l’aide de la police en la personne de Kate Lockley (Elisabeth Röhm). Si la construction peut sembler routinière – et elle l’est la plupart du temps –, elle n’en oublie pas de chambouler le spectateur, notamment avec la mort de Doyle à la mi-saison.

La notion de sacrifice est essentielle à Angel, tant dans ce que le vampire doit laisser de sa vie personnelle – il ne peut vivre de grand amour sous peine de perdre son âme – que des dangers qui planent sur tous les personnages. Si cela est exposé de manière bien plus forte et intelligente dans les saisons suivantes, le sacrifice de Doyle dans cette saison 1 est l’élément qu’il fallait pour réellement lancer la série dans une bonne dynamique. Wesley Windam Pryce (Alexis Denisof) rejoint à son tour le show, tandis que Cordelia hérite des visions et une nouvelle équipe est constituée.

Pourtant, si cela permet de dépeindre un Los Angeles bien plus sombre que Sunnydale, les histoires de la semaine peinent à garder une certaine constance tout au long de la saison. Angel souffre alors de cette formule qui l’enferme dans un canevas dont il est difficile d’extraire une vision d’ensemble sur le long terme. L’univers ne se construit presque uniquement qu’à travers ces vignettes de vies et de combats, freinant le développement d’une mythologie telle que Buffy a pu bâtir. Si l’affluence des résidents de Sunnydale (Buffy, Faith, Spike) contribue à garder une connexion avec le Whedonverse, la saison se définit surtout par sa capacité à créer des liens entre ses protagonistes principaux, avec un humour salvateur.

Fort heureusement, Angel nous présente un ennemi récurrent qui permet de maintenir un certain fil rouge tout au long de la saison. Wolfram & Hart, un cabinet d’avocats au service du Mal, veut mettre Angel hors d’état de nuire. Souvent représenté par deux avocats, Lilah Morgan (Stephanie Romanov) et Lindsay McDonald (Christian Kane), il incarne le Goliath dans le combat contre les démons du vampire et nous offre ainsi un os à ronger en attendant que les menaces se fassent plus importantes. Des pistes nous seront données au travers d’indices sur des événements à venir comme l’Apocalypse et la prophétie Shanshu concernant Angel, mais c’est ici trop maigre pour intéresser pleinement.

La première saison d’Angel est dès lors perfectible, mais pose les bases de manière consciencieuse. Il est dommage qu’elle s’enferme dans des histoires éphémères n’ayant aucun réel impact sur l’ensemble, bien que celles-ci participent à une mise en place des dynamiques entre des personnages bien écrits et une ambiance relativement légère qu’elle malmènera par la suite en fournissant des défis plus importants et plus dangereux.

Naturellement, l’intégrale d’Angel est disponible en DVD.

source

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Sam 30 Juil - 18:51

Citation :
La saison 2 d’Angel étoffe son univers et trouve le bon ton


La première saison d’Angel posait des bases solides pour la caractérisation des personnages, mais restait largement perfectible quant à sa mythologie. La série s’adresse alors à ce problème dans une seconde saison plus engageante, fourmillante d’idées déterminantes pour son univers.

Ainsi, de nouveaux soldats entrent dans la bataille entre le Bien et le Mal qui agite Los Angeles. Il faut étoffer les deux camps qui s’opposent pour leur donner plus de poids et cette saison accompagnera cela en construisant un arc au long cours, montrant des ambitions scénaristiques plus subtiles et réfléchies.

Les premiers épisodes prennent alors le temps de réintroduire les dynamiques fonctionnant en saison 1 en nous introduisant Gunn (J. August Richards), un chasseur de vampire. Il combat avec son gang dans les rues de Los Angeles et ne tarde pas à rejoindre l’agence d’Angel, poussé par sa volonté d’éradiquer le Mal. Son arrivée apporte un nouveau point de vue bienvenu dans ce combat contre les forces démoniaques. Il ne s’agit plus d’Angel (David Boreanaz) qui opère de sa tour d’ivoire, mais de la rue, là où le danger est constant, multiple et invisible. De fait, Gunn ne fera pas immédiatement confiance au vampire, développant avec lui une alliance de nécessité et non pas une amitié. Celle-ci se construira cependant tout au long de la saison.

Si Gunn intègre peu à peu l’équipe, le gentil démon Lorne (Andy Hallett) le fait également. Ces ajouts finissent d’établir des associations qui fonctionnent de mieux en mieux, donnant à Angel des alliés de taille pour les batailles à venir, mais aussi pour mener une vie à peu près normale. Enfin, l’installation à l’hôtel Hyperion leur donne une maison à défendre, matérialisant du même coup ce qu’ils ont à perdre dans leur lutte contre Wolfram & Hart.

La firme qui n’était qu’un ennemi récurrent lors de la première saison se fait plus menaçante dans la seconde fournée. Les scénaristes d’Angel semblent avoir compris qu’il leur fallait un adversaire de poids pour créer des enjeux suffisamment intéressants et solides. En faisant revenir Darla (Julie Benz), l’ancienne compagne vampirique d’Angel, le cabinet d’avocats devient le maître de marionnettes qui manipulera le destin du vampire pendant toute la saison. A l’image de ce qu’a fait Joss Whedon sur Buffy, la saison 2 a donc son Big Bad en la personne de Darla, ce qui apporte la ligne conductrice qui manquait précédemment.

Introduire un tel ennemi permet d’explorer le passé d’Angel aux travers de flashbacks qui mettent en parallèle les choix du passé face aux actions du présent. Les dilemmes qui agitent le vampire sonnent plus légitimes et quand son côté sombre et solitaire ressort avec son éloignement de ses amis, cela apparaît aussi logique que tragique.

Même si la mythologie se bâtit essentiellement sur Angel et sa lutte contre Darla, cette seconde saison n’en oublie pas pour autant Cordelia et Wesley. S’ils subissent, dans un premier temps, les sautes d’humeur de leur ami et patron, la seconde partie de saison les verra agir loin d’Angel et prendre les commandes de leur propre agence. Ils ont trouvé leur voie et n’hésitent plus à s’opposer aux décisions autoritaires de leur boss, surtout lorsqu’ils pensent qu’il fait une erreur en refusant de tuer Darla.

La fin de saison se focalisera ainsi sur la reconstruction de l’amitié entre les personnages grâce à un arc narratif détaché, mais néanmoins important. Cordelia a été aspirée dans la dimension natale de Lorne et ses amis viennent à son secours alors qu’elle est prise pour une déesse. Cette aventure permettra de resserrer les liens quelque peu écorchés pendant la saison, mais nous offre aussi l’arrivée de Fred (Amy Acker). Prisonnière depuis 5 ans dans cette dimension et devenue un peu folle, elle reviendra à Los Angeles avec l’équipe, qui apprendra alors la mort de Buffy.

Finalement, Angel trouve enfin le rythme de croisière qu’elle maintiendra pendant un certain temps. En délivrant un divertissement plus subtil qu’à ses débuts et en emmenant ses personnages vers une noirceur naissante qui ne s’arrêtera pas là, la série obtient ici le matériel adéquat pour consolider le récit d’un combat contre le Mal qui est loin d’être terminé.

Naturellement, l’intégrale d’Angel est disponible en DVD.

source

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Sam 6 Aoû - 17:52

Citation :
En saison 3, Angel est devenue encore plus prenante et plus sombre


En développant une mythologie plus imposante, la saison 2 d’Angel a prouvé qu’elle pouvait se construire en dehors d’un schéma figé, ce que cette nouvelle saison va pleinement embrasser. Cette troisième fournée d’épisodes abandonnera dès lors presque totalement la formule à la semaine pour donner corps à une intrigue aux enjeux plus intimes et importants que jamais pour le vampire et ses amis.

Alors qu’Angel (David Boreanaz) se remet de la mort de Buffy – vite ressuscitée – et que Fred (Amy Acker) tente de s’acclimater à son retour dans sa dimension natale, le début de saison se présente comme une reconstruction de personnages brisés par les événements d’une vie liée au sacrifice de soi. Si les scénaristes adoptent ce point de départ, c’est pour se focaliser sur l’équipe et les liens d’entraide et d’amitié qui se tissent autour de ces deux figures avec Fred comme « mission » de sauvetage.

Après d’âpres débats internes sur son utilité au sein d’Angel Investigations, la jeune femme choisit de rester et faire partie intégrante de cette famille ressoudée. Amy Acker excelle en offrant à Fred toute la profondeur et la candeur qui viendra la caractériser. Elle devient un atout indéniable à la série qui avait bien besoin d’un autre personnage féminin aux côtés de Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter).

La notion de famille sera centrale à cette saison 3 dès que Darla (Julie Benz) réapparait. Elle n’avait pas terminé son histoire et revient avec une surprise de taille : elle est enceinte d’Angel. Cette conception surnaturelle lance alors le premier arc de la saison où le vampire va devoir combattre pour accepter la situation et défendre le bébé à venir face à Wolfram & Hart qui voudrait le récupérer. Tous les protagonistes se focalisent ainsi sur cet unique but qui nous emmènera jusqu’à la mi-saison.

Cette première partie de saison matérialise plus que jamais le besoin d’Angel d’avoir une famille. Que ce soit celle choisie ou celle qui s’impose à lui, elles convergent en lui pour lui donner une motivation pour continuer à se battre. Les scénaristes utilisent ce fil rouge au milieu de quelques cas à la semaine pour poser lentement les pierres d’une histoire qui va prendre une ampleur plus importante quand le bébé naîtra. Point nodal de la saison et de la série, la naissance de Connor – qui verra Darla se sacrifier pour lui – amorce dès lors une intrigue qui construira le reste de la saison et la dépassera même.

Un antagoniste de taille surgit alors du passé d’Angel pour mettre en péril ce qui lui est cher. Daniel Holtz (Keith Szarabajka), un chasseur de vampires dont la famille a été tuée par Angelus, revient se venger. Les différents éléments de l’histoire se positionnent de manière judicieuse, montrant en parallèle le (bref) sentiment de bonheur d’Angel en famille et la construction d’une petite armée par Holtz pour renverser son ennemi.

Si Holtz se révèle un adversaire de taille, ce n’est pas foncièrement pour sa connexion avec Angel dont on explore un peu plus le passé pour mieux souligner le présent. C’est surtout pour la façon dont il met à exécution son plan, entraînant dans son sillage des humains qu’il manipule psychologiquement, allant même jusqu’à manœuvrer la trahison de Wesley (Alexis Denisof). Ce dernier, en découvrant une (fausse) prophétie annonçant le meurtre de Connor par Angel – enlève le bébé pour le sauver. Véritable point de bascule de la saison, cet événement élance le récit dans des directions tragiques véritablement prenantes.

La montée graduelle des enjeux se fait alors par la minutieuse mise en place d’une partie d’échecs où les camps se multiplient avec comme principal objectif ce nouveau-né hors-norme. L’intrigue sera pourtant chamboulée une nouvelle fois quand Wesley se fera trancher la gorge et que Connor sera enlevé dans une autre dimension par Holtz sous les yeux d’Angel et de Lilah (Stephanie Romanov). Le statu quo n’est plus une option et le récit ne fera que prendre en ampleur jusqu’à la fin.

Le retour d’un Connor adolescent (Vincent Kartheiser) quelques épisodes après avoir été kidnappé enfant nous entraîne alors dans une histoire de vengeance œdipienne jouant magnifiquement de l’ambiguïté entre la nécessité d’une figure de père, celle d’une structure familiale et l’impossibilité d’une normalité à cause du monde démoniaque dans lequel la série prend place. Connor ne peut que grandir déséquilibré et Angel, impuissant, voit se réaliser un futur qu’il voulait épargner à son fils.

La chute détruit en écho le sentiment de famille que ses débuts avaient construit. Angel termine donc sa troisième saison sur un constat d’échec aux antipodes de la précédente. En adoptant une structure plus axée sur la mythologie, les scénaristes ont réussi à faire monter crescendo les enjeux pour leur donner une portée encore plus dramatique. Ce choix narratif porte clairement ses fruits, épousant pleinement la noirceur que la série avait en elle et poussant ses personnages aux confins du désespoir lorsque s’annonce la saison 4.

Naturellement, l’intégrale d’Angel est disponible en DVD.

source

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Sam 13 Aoû - 15:04

Citation :
L’Apocalypse s’invite chez Angel dans une saison 4 maîtrisée.



Avec la saison 3, les scénaristes d’Angel ont prouvé qu’ils étaient désormais assez à l’aise avec leur univers pour ne plus se reposer sur un schéma particulier pour développer des histoires. La mythologie prend alors toute la place dans le récit qui se construit progressivement. Ce mode opératoire est réutilisé dans la quatrième saison centrée sur l’Apocalypse, la menace tant prophétisée depuis les débuts de la série.

Celle-ci débute au figuré suie à la dissolution de l’équipe d’Angel Investigations qui a conclu la saison dernière. Dès le premier épisode, il nous faut désamorcer une situation désespérée. Même une fois que Wesley (Alexis Denisof) récupère Angel (David Boreanaz) au fond de l’océan et que celui-ci parvient à faire revenir Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter), la troupe n’est plus la même. L’amnésie qui caractérise le retour de la jeune femme souligne alors la nécessité d’oublier les événements passés pour aller vers l’avant et les défis qui s’annoncent.

Si le début de saison se concentre particulièrement sur la reconstruction de relations en défriche, il prépare également le terrain pour le grand arc qui occupera la quasi-intégralité des 22 épisodes : l’Apocalypse. Évoquée depuis la première saison, nous savons au final peu de choses à son sujet, mais le teasing autour d’Angel, de Connor (Vincent Kartheiser) puis de Cordelia se révèle être efficace. La saison va alors se construire comme un puzzle se jouant à couvert et dont nous ne découvrirons le tableau d’ensemble que tard

La première partie de saison verra les personnages lutter pour se pardonner, mais aussi contre la Bête. Ce monstre indestructible se révèlera n’être qu’une façade pour masquer quelque chose de plus grand. Si son introduction impose enfin un sentiment de réel danger, elle vaudra surtout pour ce qu’elle apporte aux relations entre les personnages. Le retour d’Angelus permet alors d’extérioriser toutes les rancœurs enfouies depuis quelque temps et ainsi de remettre à plat les liens qui les unissent. Débarrassés de ces poids, ils peuvent sereinement affronter ce qui les attend.

Au sein de cette saison 4 se développe une relation qui n’a pourtant rien pour séduire. Amnésique, Cordelia trouve refuge auprès de Connor. Ils vont coucher ensemble et un enfant doit naitre de cette union. Leur alliance semble dès le départ hors propos et peine à être crédible. Là où les scénaristes démontrent toute leur aise et leur maîtrise de la série, c’est qu’ils font de cette incongruité un élément du récit. En effet, si la relation paraît fausse, c’est qu’elle l’est : Cordelia, possédée par un démon depuis son retour, utilise Connor pour enfanter une déesse qui apportera l’Apocalypse.

Tout comme en saison 3, la naissance de l’enfant – qui se révèlera être une belle femme nommée Jasmine (Gina Torres) – est le point de bascule de la mi-saison. Les enjeux développés tout au long de la première partie vont donc pleinement se déployer pour que la véritable Apocalypse se passe et monopolise le reste du récit. Cette construction montre à nouveau toute l’efficacité du parti-pris scénaristique, offrant une montée en puissance réellement prenante.

En choisissant un ennemi comme Jasmine – qui est en réalité une déesse démoniaque cherchant à recréer son ancien empire en soumettant les humains à sa volonté –, Angel s’interroge sur la nature du Mal et sa possible nécessité dans la balance de l’univers. Jasmine fait ainsi une proposition qui peut en convaincre plus d’un : prôner une paix universelle au prix de quelques sacrifices en son honneur. Si l’équipe, à l’exception de Fred (Amy Acker), n’a pas l’opportunité de réfléchir ni de résister à Jasmine dans un premier temps, les scénaristes adressent à travers cela une problématique pertinente. Est-il acceptable de laisser le Mal gagner si c’est pour sauver le plus grand nombre ? Quel prix est convenable en échange d’une paix perpétuelle ?

Pour Angel, cela se fera avec des compromis, que ce soit avec l’affrontement final contre Jasmine ou lors du face-à-face désespéré contre Connor qui conclura la saison. Il n’est pas prêt à stopper le combat et pourtant, il ne veut plus perdre ceux qu’ils aiment.

En somme, cette quatrième saison d’Angel parvient à bâtir un arc narratif solide qui porte l’ensemble sans se révéler prévisible et profite du temps qui lui est imparti pour exploiter tous ses composants sans tomber dans la redondance. Il reste à Angel une guerre à finir avant de tirer sa révérence, celle qu’il mène depuis le départ et qui sera la plus dure, mais aussi le plus faible : Wolfram & Hart.

Naturellement, l’intégrale d’Angel est disponible en DVD.

source

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Sam 20 Aoû - 15:40

Citation :
Angel termine le combat chez Wolfram & Hart dans une saison 5 moyenne




Dans Angel, il y a un avant et un après l’Apocalypse. Cet événement annoncé depuis le début de la série se matérialise dans une saison 4 qui était à l’apogée de ce que le show a pu offrir de mieux et forme une sorte de conclusion à une ère importante. Connor, Cordelia, les prophéties… tout cela a servi de fil rouge depuis la seconde saison et Angel doit alors trouver de nouveaux motifs pour continuer. La saison 5 nous introduit ainsi un défi d’une autre nature.

En proposant à Angel (David Boreanaz) et à ses amis la direction de Wolfram & Hart, les partenaires du cabinet d’avocats ouvrent la voie pour une forme différente de combat pour l’équipe, faire un pacte avec le « diable » pour qu’elle puisse œuvrer à faire le bien. Cela force la série à retrouver une formule qu’elle avait progressivement abandonnée au profit d’une mythologie plus immersive. Les cas de la semaine refont leur apparition et l’inconstance scénaristique avec eux.

Les clients vont donc affluer dans les nouveaux bureaux d’Angel. La différence à présent est qu’ils ne sont plus des innocents cherchant de l’aide, puisqu’ils représentent souvent le Mal sous toutes ses formes. La majeure partie de cette saison 5 se concentrera alors sur l’acclimatation de nos acolytes – Angel, Fred (Amy Acker), Gunn (J. August Richards), Wesley (Alexis Denisof ) et Lorne (Andy Hallett) – aux nouveaux standards auxquels ils doivent répondre et sur leur lutte pour qu’une certaine justice ressorte de leur association avec Wolfram & Hart.

Cela pousse Angel à faire un examen de conscience des personnages et de leurs motivations. Ils atteignent le bout d’une réflexion courant depuis quelques saisons : il faut travailler avec le côté obscur – de soi, du Mal – pour œuvrer pour le plus grand bien. Cette alliance contre-nature apparaît donc comme étant la réponse finale au combat qu’Angel mène contre Wolfram & Hart depuis son arrivée à Los Angeles. Incapables de se détruire, ils doivent collaborer main dans la main pour avancer. Les scénaristes redoublent cette fraternisation avec l’ennemi en ajoutant Spike (James Marsters) à l’équation. Outre son statut de challenger pour Angel – et son rôle de « champion » –, son arrivée nous montre qu’il faut faire des compromis avec ses anciens ennemis pour espérer gagner du terrain.

Cette idée directrice dans la saison 5 peine cependant à prendre véritablement forme à cause de sa formule. Ce choix de structure narrative apparaît comme étant un retour en arrière pour la série qui ne trouve alors plus le souffle dont elle a besoin pour développer une mythologie digne de ce nom. La saison avait pourtant pour elle de se focaliser sur Wolfram & Hart, l’ennemi ultime d’Angel.

Vu la persistance de sa lutte, il est normal que le cabinet soit le dernier opposant debout. Incarné par Lilah (Stephanie Romanov) avant sa mort en saison 4, Wolfram & Hart paraissait indestructible tout en étant un pion nécessaire pour le show et le maintient d’une certaine continuité dans sa mythologie. Cependant, avec Angel aux commandes, la firme semble plus inoffensive que jamais, ce qui rend le combat final qui se prépare assez morne. Ce n’est pas que les enjeux ne sont pas présents, mais ils ne réussissent pas à prendre de l’ampleur au cours de la saison comme ce fut le cas auparavant.

En voulant se faire synthèse de la série et de sa raison d’exister, cette saison 5 d’Angel ne décolle pas réellement. Certes, elle délivre des histoires intéressantes, notamment autour du retour de Spike ou de Fred, mais elle tarde à affirmer une destination vers laquelle elle tendrait. Quand arrive l’ultime bataille, Angel trouve difficilement l’émotion et la tension nécessaire à cause du peu de travail réalisé pour développer les tenants et aboutissants de cette lutte finale.

Si la fin paraît un peu bricolée à la dernière minute, elle parvient tout de même à nous donner quelques beaux et tragiques moments. Un résultat obtenu en grande partie grâce au fait qu’Angel et ses alliés n’ont simplement plus rien à perdre. Résignés à mourir, ils se lancent tête baissée vers une défaite certaine et la chute de la série nous laissera dans l’expectative sur l’issue de l’affrontement, mais avec une équipe plus que jamais soudée face à leur ennemi.

Cette cinquième et dernière saison d’Angel s’est donc un peu trop enfermée dans une formule usée pour donner corps à une réelle montée en tension. Les éléments étaient pourtant présents, puisqu’en s’attaquant de l’intérieur à son opposant de toujours, Angel revient à la source du Mal à Los Angeles et l’enjeu du combat signifie la fin. Quand celle-ci arrive, la série semble néanmoins à bout de souffle, nous confortant dans l’idée qu’il était temps que cela se termine parce qu’elle avait raconté tout ce qu’elle avait en elle. Dommage qu’elle fasse son baroud d’honneur sur une saison sympathique, mais prévisible, qui a toutefois le mérite de nous offrir une conclusion émotionnelle à la gloire des personnages.

Naturellement, l’intégrale d’Angel est disponible en DVD.

source

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
Miss Kitty
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
avatar

Messages : 9367
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : Out of this World

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Jeu 21 Déc - 20:05

Tiens, j'ai rêvé de David et Charisma cette nuit !!

Je me trouvais à un événement style convention (mais il y avait énormément de monde, comme à un Comic Con, donc je pense que c'était plus un truc du style), et j'étais super enthousiaste à l'idée de prendre une photo avec eux ensemble (car c'était proposé dans les ventes). J'avais mon ticket pour eux et pour plusieurs autres acteurs (pas de précision sur lesquels dans mon rêve), sauf que pour une raison inconnue, le temps passait très, très vite, et en fait, la fin de journée était déjà arrivée et je loupais TOUTES mes photos. J'étais trop dég, surtout pour David & Charisma en fait.

Voilà, super profond comme rêve lol!  Je sais pas du tout pourquoi ça me vient maintenant Razz
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://spuffy-and-cangel.forumactif.com/forum
angel_15
Little miss addict
Little miss addict
avatar

Messages : 7851
Date d'inscription : 30/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : In Star City with Oliver Queen

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Jeu 21 Déc - 20:52

Haha j'adore ^^ as-tu une convention qui approche?

_________________

I think, in this place, you grab love wherever you can find it.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://leavingyoubehind.shattered-memories.net
Miss Kitty
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
How rare & beautiful it is to even exist ♥
avatar

Messages : 9367
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 28
Localisation : Out of this World

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Jeu 21 Déc - 21:00

Pour le Buffyverse, non, aucune ! Juste pour SPN. Je pense que j'ai été traumatisée de ne pas avoir ma photo avec Jensen & Misha à la JIB Con, ça se répercute sur tous mes autres ships lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://spuffy-and-cangel.forumactif.com/forum
a.a.k
Cangel 'till the end
Cangel 'till the end
avatar

Messages : 23652
Date d'inscription : 29/06/2009
Age : 30
Localisation : In Jensen's arms

MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   Jeu 21 Déc - 21:24

lol! Effectivement, je pense que ton inconscient essaye de te dire quelque chose!

Mais c'est mignon quand même

_________________




“Woman? Is that meant to insult me? I would return the slap, if I took you for a man.” ~ Daenerys Targaryen
You're a lot smarter than you look. Of course, you look like a retard ~ Cordelia Chase
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://cangelbestlovers.positifforum.com/
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Angel: le concept   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Angel: le concept
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» NOEL - Au délice des anges (Angel's Delight)
» Les MY LITTLE ANGEL de Nhtpirate1980
» Pre-order de Septembre 2010 / Pury White Angel & Laches Black Devil
» les Sonny Angel de Champomie
» CREME CUP OU ANGEL en RAL

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
World is a Fiction :: Fanfictions: les privilégiés :: Angel :: Discussions-
Sauter vers: